What I Learned from Cookie, The Rodeo Clown: Liberals don’t have a chance

I have to thank Cookie, the rodeo clown, for a great night at the rodeo in Cody, Wyoming.  One of my sons-in-law suggested we go to the rodeo as a family while doing some extensive travel out west.  On our way to where we were staying for the night, he pointed out the big arena dedicated to nightly rodeos during the summer months, complete with mountains and vast desert in the background. I’ve been to rodeos in the past, the kind that comes to towns like Butler County, Ohio in a fairground setting, or some of the big ones that come to the arena in downtown Cincinnati. Still, I can say that I had never had the opportunity to see one in the west, where they usually do them in town.  There, they are the centerpieces of social activity, and this open-air arena in Cody was meant to hold thousands of people, of which it was filled when we arrived.  The sun was setting, the air was chilling, and it was just about a perfect day.  The crowd was filled with real Americans, and we were about as far away from Washington D.C. politics as we could get, and it was refreshing.  Many F-Biden flags were blowing from the tailgates in the parking lot, which was an otherwise reminder of what was happening in the world outside of Cody.  Nowhere did we see a corrosive liberal, which made the hotdogs and concession Cokes taste so much better. 

The Rodeo in Cody, Wyoming

When you hear stories like the one from this week of New York prosecutors harassing Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg over accusations of tax dealings, we all know it’s purely political; how the political left weaponizes law enforcement to impose social will on all participants in society.  That was one reason I was on a trip out west with my family, which consisted of over 5000 miles by the time we were back home.  I wanted to see lots of open places where there were few people so that I could get right in my mind the fight that we had before us.  I don’t live in a big city like New York.  Cincinnati has all the good things of a big city and all the good things of a rural community, so I’m pleased with it as a place to be.  But it is on the front line of the greater global battle that is going on between global progressives and traditional conservatives.  And when I need a vacation, I more need to be away from the people causing all the trouble than really embarking on a regional endeavor.  I knew where we were going, but I was a little surprised by the height of the mountains crossing Wyoming going to Cody, next to Yellowstone, followed by a vast desert between the mountains and our destination for the night. 

Arriving in Cody, Wyoming, founded by Buffalo Bill, a person who has had a significant impact on my life over the years, it was like a mirage that just arose out of the harsh countryside.  I know of Buffalo Bill because of my exposure to the western arts over the years, specifically the Annie Oakley Festival in Darke County, Ohio, every year.  Annie Oakley worked in Buffalo Bill’s show, and that was what that celebration honored, was a tribute which I often participated in those Buffalo Bill Wild West Shows.  So, for me going to a town founded based on Buffalo Bill was quite a pleasant pilgrimage.  Just visiting a place like that was enough for me.  When we decided actually to participate in the culture of that town and go to a rodeo at the capital of rodeos in the world, well, that made a special night spectacular for me.  While driving through the desert to get there, I was thinking about the problems back home, in the political world.  I was wondering how anybody ever thought they were going to get away with election fraud, and how they were going to try to divert everyone’s attention from the crimes of the century with Covid, and mass voter fraud, the phony prosecution of the Trump Organization, Rudy Giuliani himself, Sydney Powell and many others.  Justice had to be enacted toward the vile despots who had to take over our government, and I was thinking about how to do that as we arrived.  For me, Cody, Wyoming, was like a nice drink of cold water when I needed it most. 

Enjoying the atmosphere

A rodeo is often made or broken based on the rodeo clowns who work the night entertaining the audience while corralling the animals after the sets are completed safely behind the scenes.  They have rodeos like this every night all over the west; I saw advertisements for them in Deadwood, Cheyenne, even down in Vernal, Utah.  Conservatives were entirely in their element; there was likely no Democrat who voted for Joe Biden anywhere close.  Probably the government workers at the National Parks and down in Jackson, Wyoming, but all other places were strong Republicans who were still very supportive of President Trump.  Cookie, the rodeo clown, knew that as he told jokes during the show.  I have included an example here for review.  Most of the audience members were not from back east; this was an everyday ritual for them.  But for me, it was much needed after a rough year of politics.  Where I live, the Biden presidency is like a cloud over everything in life, primarily because I am politically active.  Not everyone pays as close attention to these kinds of things as I do.  But for the people of Cody, Wyoming, all they knew of Joe Biden was indicated on those flags flying from those truck beds.  They had no tolerance for liberals, and I had an answer to a question I never really thought of asking until I went to that rodeo.  There would never be a political insurgency in America.  There was no threat of these coastal liberals taking over the country.  I had at that point seen enough of the country to know that these were not a conquered people.  The only reason there wasn’t an all-out war between conservatives and liberals was that the distances of land kept them far enough apart to prevent the conflict.  But there was no risk of liberals taking away nights at the rodeo like I was watching.  Most of what we saw of that fight was just a Truman Show-like setting that existed entirely in media.  It had no grip on reality.

Cookie, the Rodeo Clown, wasn’t trying to change the world; he and his partners were doing their good and honest thing.  They were undoubtedly Christian soldiers who were deeply committed to a conservative lifestyle reflected in their jokes of the evening.  After the show, I talked to the rodeo clowns. I noticed that they had crosses on their facepaint indicating a religious foundation for the performance of each of them, including Cookie.  I appreciated that because it let me know that these were not people who would be pushed around, the way progressives on both coasts thought they could get away with doing.  Where the rubber hit the road out in places like Cody, Wyoming, there was no yielding to evil.  They were more than ready to go to war with it, and on that night, I saw just how hard of a line of defense we had in America.  America was far from broken.  Liberals had no idea what kind of fight they had picked and how far toward a loss completely they were already on.

Rich Hoffman

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