Bigfoot in the Upper Peninsula: The 10 Kingdoms of Atlantis

Paranormal investigation, ancient history, and the effects of secret societies upon the world hidden from the shadows of direct influence have always been topics I enjoy thinking about. I would argue that expanding the limits of what you measure in life as a means to reality makes your sampling more accurate and understanding of the problems involved. But I never took any of those investigations very seriously prior to Covid. Yet now that we know what we do about the governments of the world and what they did with Covid, and election fraud, the phony mechanisms of Climate Change as a new global religion, I am willing to accept that some of these hidden influences that usually fall under the conspiracy theory category have much more relevance in our lives. So when you are looking for answers and solving problems, I like to take vacations where extremities of contemplation take place most effectively, and that is how I found myself with my family in St. Ignace, Michigan, staying in a small convoy of RVs at a very strategic campground near wonderful food, proximity to many interesting tourist locations, and best yet, lots of local bookstores filled with rare publications about scary local legends about Bigfoot, Mothmen, ghosts in the night, and UFOs that seem to use the Great Lakes as a base of operations for some timeless enterprise that is beyond the grasp of our current civilization. One thing that jumped out to me immediately was that Bigfoot sightings were common in the Mackinac Island region around where we were camped. The St. Ignace gift shops had embraced their paranormal fate much the way Roswell, New Mexico, had, which is great for business. But what were people seeing and why in that part of the world?

The Great Lakes used to be giant river valleys, especially Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. When the last Ice Age came through, the glacial ice shoved down the earth’s crust to such a degree that those valleys became lakebeds that now form the Great Lakes. Lake Superior was there already, but the remnants of the Ice Age developed the other lakes, and that age came to an abrupt end when the Younger Dryas cataclysm created Saginaw Bay to the south as the impact crater from a broken-up comet that had massive debris striking the earth around 11,600 years ago causing yet another mass extinction event. For all the liberals of the new religion of Climate Change, humans only have a few thousand years to figure things out. Mother Earth, as they like to term it, is not infinite; the new global replacement for the goddess Isis of so much esoteric literature talked about in mason halls all across the world is very perishable. The earth gets hit by lots of cosmic debris, and life is always in a condition of extinction. If a life form can move into space, it needs to as quickly as possible. The Younger Dryas cataclysm looks to have wiped out the remnants of civilization completely that may have been as advanced as our own, predating that Ice Age and forming globally in North America after the last, around 100,000 years ago. It only takes a few thousand years to go from rubbing sticks together to having advanced economies. However, all the things we build, if not with stone, tend to erode away within ten thousand years. That being said, everything made in America could disappear in that time due to erosion, so stories of Atlantis and Luminaria likely have lots of merit to them. And after many collections of unique literature passed down through the ages and essentially influencing the eventual creation of the Indus Valley, Sumer, and Egypt, by the time those stories reached those civilizations we now consider to be ancient, the stories were ancient before the ice started melting during that last Ice Age. After the Younger Dryas cataclysm, the only survivors would have been those far away from the impacts and the societies that depended on global commerce for their sustenance. That would explain why there are similar religions and methods of economic life all around the world when we have always thought of primitive life as not being able to perform any technology until our present understanding of the Vico Cycle. 

So in the pre-Ice Age period, the Great Lakes were dry, and there are many intelligent thoughts that North America was the breadbasket for the 10 Kingdoms of Atlantis. Currently, there are many thoughts about the roots of Atlantian civilization in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, where the plate from a tectonic shift sunk a large land mass. It wouldn’t be the first time something like that had happened. There are also prevalent reports, especially if you listen to the Joe Rogan podcast that talks about these issues a lot these days, that there were cities of Atlantis in the now dry regions of west Africa. Likely that there were lots of things lost in translation by the time the Egyptians received the stories of Atlantis. Plato wrote them down before the Romans burnt down the great library at Alexandria in Egypt to cast away all previous pagan societies, erasing all this from conscious memory. It was kind of the ancient version of Dr. Fauci and Bill Gates denying Covid patients hydroxychloroquine and Ivermectin as a treatment for a virus created in a Chinese lab to invoke the Great Reset by the Desecrators of Davos. When the Romans burnt the library, they attempted to spread a new religion that would unite their empire: Christianity. These things happen all the time.

Bigfoot sightings are common in upper Michigan and in eastern Ohio. It just so happens that those are also deeply wooded areas with very little impact from modern society. I think people see more paranormal activity in these areas because they are less distracted by everyday life. But specifically in these regions, there were likely remnants of this ancient society that is yet unrecorded by history. In the paranormal activity, we see quantum entanglement, where living creatures and their technology coexist with our present age, but not necessarily in physical form. We may see each other, but only perceptually through information locked in neutrinos and other faster than light elements being revealed by quantum physics. I didn’t have any worries about a Bigfoot attack at our camps while in St. Ignace. But I did find the full embrace of the local culture fascinating as a rationalization for the paranormal. I found it particularly interesting that there have been frequent sightings of the Mothman in Chicago just down the lake from our camp on Lake Michigan from 2017 to the present; that is all over the place, especially at O’Hare airport. This is the same creature that terrorized the inhabitants of Point Pleasant, Ohio, in the late 60s before a bridge collapse that killed many people. As we all know, Chicago is experiencing a major catastrophe of violence due to liberal policies, so it is notable that the Mothman is showing itself there at this particular time. Yet with all that to contemplate, St. Ignace, Mackinac Island, and the surrounding area were absolutely fantastic. The famous fudge was delicious. And it was clearly one of the great American treasures. But even better yet, there are deep mysteries there that penetrate our current understandings of modern science, and I found all that just delightful as a vacation destination.

Rich Hoffman

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