Defending Alex Jones: The stageplay that hides the many crimes of the Administrative State

No matter what someone might think of Alex Jones and his Infowars broadcasts, he continues to be the example that the administrative state uses to enforce their vision for policy control. We saw it clearly when he was banned from YouTube a number of years ago. What followed after that was shocking to many, but Alex Jones saw the strategy first. And of course, in this crazy trial where supposedly Sandy Hook victims from that terrible school shooting are allowed to seek financial compensation for how they feel about what Alex Jones said about the case, which was essentially that it was a school shooting scripted by government characters designed to advance changes in social sentiment toward guns. For that belief and his broadcast of it to others, we are supposed to clap and cheer that the court and jury are awarding to those victims millions and millions of dollars of confiscated wealth from Jones as punishment for not believing in the official narrative issued by the government about the tragedy of the story. It’s a clear violation of 1st Amendment protections, but the calculation is that nobody in their right mind would defend Alex Jones for his preposterously inflated statements. Everyone, including Jones, can agree that Sandy Hook was a tragic school shooting. But the beliefs of what should happen as a result of that school shooting have been wide-ranging, and obviously, the characters who are behind the school shooting with direct complicity needed a certain kind of narrative to hit the public so that control of that public can be maintained, unimpeded by people like Jones.

Like many people who find themselves in these crooked courts these days, I like Alex Jones. I think his show is valuable in asking questions that should be asked in a free society. But obviously, from the administrative state perspective, and this is undoubtedly the case with Warroom with Steve Bannon as well, questioning authority was never in the plan of these new globalist insurgents. I say new because Americans aren’t very familiar with them. Up until Covid came along, Americans only knew about these types of people from Alex Jones broadcasts, and I would say without insulting him that Jones is just an ordinary guy uniquely looking at the world and asking questions the way a typical person who attends demolition derbies, and flea markets might. Alex Jones represents how many people think about things, which is the key to his success over the years. That is also why he’s a target because the administrative state wants to show that Alex Jones can be taken down, and so can anybody else.   The whole point of the trial, which is the front page news of every outlet in the world presently, is to demonstrate that a rigged court could destroy Jones and his Infowars, and there was nothing that could be done about it. Yet when Jones talks about the court being rigged, the deck is so stacked against him that much of what he says comes out sounding like a lunatic. Because nobody can coordinate the way he suggests, people just aren’t that smart. Jones always misses the root cause of the conspiracies because he often gets soaked up in what happens in the world, not so much in why. But because of this case, I think it’s probably time to get into the details of who these administrative state people really are and why they are so dangerous. And how America was formed to eliminate them from the world stage. 

Alex Jones often touches on many of these demonic and cryptic characters, and his analysis can be funny, entertaining, and boisterously over the top. I enjoy his broadcasts, but they often do not get to the details I like to deal with. But if he were like that, the show’s entertainment value would disappear, and he would not be as popular to the masses as he is. I often think of things as a stage play, and the media, our courts, and our political order are presented to us in a way that we might attend a play. What happened on that stage, which was clearly the narrative of the court case against Alex Jones, was the crucifixion and complete destruction of a leading figure who used the First Amendment to resist the power of the global administrative state. But what makes that play work are the ticket takers, the ushers, the stagehands behind the curtain, and the costume makers; they all play a part behind the scenes to make that show on stage happen. And we are only supposed to be watching the stage, the things they want us to look at. But if you really want to understand the play you are watching and to determine its quality, then you have to look at everything, including what’s behind the stage, to the real essence of the show. Alex Jones has made his living talking about the things that are backstage while people are watching him on stage. Hearing him talk about it is one thing, but seeing it and understanding it is much harder because what he’s talking about is concealed from the public’s view. The media is the curtain, and the real elements that keep the play alive are concealed there.

The court proceeding’s primary goal in the Alex Jones case was essential to ignore the American concept of free speech, to make a person liable for other people’s feelings. They were to confiscate the wealth from Jones in much the same way that the inquisition in Europe used to against enemies of the court for precisely the same reasons. It’s a show of power that the court doesn’t deserve to have, and America was formed to destroy in the world. And here it is in our courts, hiding behind victims of a terrible school shooting for the purpose that the school shooting occurred. The question about what motives created the shooting is not discussed, and for having a theory about what those might be and how insensitive they were to the victims is the point of the massacre, to establish case law that can then be applied to many more cases in the future. If Jones can go down for the opinions of others, then the door is opened for many other issues over much more minor infractions. And because Jones is such a wild figure, most of the people in the best positions to defend him are silent because they don’t want to be tagged with a “conspiracy” title next to their names. So they remain hidden from the conflict without opinion so to avoid the disaster of affiliation. And in that way, the courts are just as Alex said they were; it was a coordinated attack. Only the participants aren’t exactly conscious of it. Instead, they know their job in putting on the play; they learned how to play their parts in the show during their many years of public schooling and college. So they often do those jobs without being told and, in that way, are complicit. The evil isn’t conducted in the way we are trained to see it in movies and books; the narrative is not on the stage; it’s off behind the curtain. Alex stands on the stage like a maniac and talks about how evil it is just outside of everyone’s vision. But, unfortunately, people only see Jones, under the lights and with the microphone talking about it. And thus, that is how the show goes on and why Alex Jones is being isolated and destroyed by those invisible hands who have always run the administrative state. 

I think Alex Jones will be fine. He could do his show in the back of a car if he wanted. He could run Infowars as a guerrilla operation with a limited staff, so his show will go on. But what we have learned from his trial is another matter. That administrative state has shown itself in ways that have people curious about what’s happening behind the scenes, and they may be ready to hear it. And for that, I think I can help show them around, and will. 

Rich Hoffman

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