A Review of ‘I’ll Take Your Questions Now’: It’s all about ‘The Doctrine of the Lesser Magistrates’

The Truth about Trump’s Success

To understand why I love Stephanie Grisham’s new book, I’ll Take Your Questions Now; you’d have to understand the contents of the excellent book The Doctrine of the Lesser Magistrates or even why I get very excited about Thanksgiving and the jail cell of one of the founders of the Mayflower journey in Canterbury, England.  Or why I get excited about Salisbury, England, where one of the four Magna Cartas currently resides.  Humans have been on a long trek for personal freedom and liberty. When we elected Donald Trump, it was essentially a declaration of independence against the global forces trying to sucker the United States into the grand scheme of globalism, for which most in the Beltway had no idea was even happening. Stephanie’s book indeed revealed that, in all its glorious detail.  Even working so close to the Trump family, Stephanie never figured out what happened or why.  And the media she had such a tight relationship with never understood either.  Without knowing it, their lives were prepared for them to think a certain way about things, which essentially was just another attempt by global forces to dominate those lesser magistrates of politics from top to bottom. Henry the 8th burned people at the stake or Henry the II killed the great Thomas Becket at the Canterbury Cathedral to rule us all with the same tyranny. I’ve stood in that spot and rubbed the ground where his blood was spilled for going against Henry the 8th and the power grabs between the church and state.  I have a profound hatred of tyranny in all forms, and I’ve been researching it in person around the world.  I appreciate The Doctrine of the Lesser Magistrates not just in principle but in the courage of a long line of patriots in forming them.  And when you wonder why the rest of the world doesn’t get it, you get a tell-all book like Stephanie Grisham’s, which reminds you of the real problems. 

I came out of reading I’ll Take Your Questions Now feeling very sorry for Stephanie Grisham.  Through the Trumps, she had opportunities she would never have received under more conventional White House occupants.  President Trump is a big personality who figures he can overcome anything.  He takes chances on people others wouldn’t, and that is undoubtedly the story of Stephanie Grisham, who would become the Press Secretary of both the President and First Lady in the White House during their term in office.  I understand Trump’s management style.  Sometimes you take big chances on people, and you find that diamond in the rough that turns out to be spectacular.  They just needed a leader to give them a chance to shine.  But often, probably 75% of the time, you get a dud that burns out, and that is what happened to Stephanie by the end of the Trump White House.  Covid quarantining, conventional thinking on her part, and her boyfriend’s nasty break-up, who also worked in the White House, was too much for her, and she broke.  Competitive relationships with co-workers didn’t help, and she didn’t have it in her.  Because she worked for the Trumps closely, after the White House, the world has not been kind to Stephanie, so she wrote a tell-all book detailing intimate secrets about the Trumps hoping to project her into a new life with a fresh start.  She admits that she’s a kind of liberal that identifies more as a John McCain Republican than a Donald Trump.  And by the end of her time with Trump, that became more obvious for her.  She didn’t have the stomach for all the unconventional thinking, and she fell from grace and wrote about it as if she were writing a diary that she’d share with the world.  In that way, it’s a fascinating book. 

I don’t typically talk about The Doctrine of the Lesser Magistrates. Still, as I was reading Stephanie’s book, I was involved in several engagements that brought it all together for me.  First was legal advice regarding the illegitimate Joe Biden’s executive order on all federal contractors.  This is just the kind of overreach warned about in that great book based on that long trajectory of freedom that I am obsessed with.  Then I was at a candidate forum with several people running for Trustee in townships I’m concerned with. I noticed that my friends, Mark Welch and Todd Minniear, discussed the book as part of the philosophical debate regarding Covid protocols and many recent instances of government overreach.  Todd brought his copy of the book to the meeting, which impressed me.  These were a couple of guys running for local office who understood the job of office pushback in politics to protect the interests of the people who voted them into power.  Stephanie never understood because she was such a conventional and educated thinker what role Trump played along those same lines.  The assumption is that the President of the United States is in the most powerful position in the world.  But to the Davos crowd, the United Nations people genuinely want to rule the world as a conglomerate of socialists from the Old World.  And the aggression of China who plans to follow Marxism to global domination, the United States is just another country.  They don’t care about our laws, our way of life, or what happens to us in the future. They’d love to not compete with us, so when it comes to the President of the United States, they want to view us as a lesser magistrate.  In that role, which voters for Trump have an innate understanding along the lines of the trajectory of freedom, they put Trump in power to resist those forces.  Even as close as she was to all the significant events, Stephanie never saw the big picture.  She only ever saw how the media might interpret those events, so she set to work to steer the Trumps this way and that for the benefit of the press.  Never for the overall objective of what was suitable for our country. 

I think it helped that Stephanie felt like a woman scorned fresh from a divorce of the Trumps, complaining as an ex-wife would about everything they hate about someone they once loved.  The rejection of that love drove out of her a truth we may never have seen otherwise.  But what she thought were faults, where Trump didn’t listen to other people, where the President would refer to himself as a genius, in the scheme of what it took to resist the imposition as a lessor magistrate from global forces, Trump was perfect and highly successful.  But even more so, Melania Trump proved that she was more than just a pretty face.  She was a keen and influential voice in the White House who truly loved class and freedom in ways nobody understood.  As I said in the video above, I’ve met the Trumps on a few occasions.  Occasionally when I get around celebrities, I’m not the type who asks for a picture, but they’ll ask if I want one, so I’ll take one.  But I don’t seek them out because I like to put people at ease under those conditions. I’ve seen the Trumps up close, and I thought about those meetings while reading Stephanie’s book, and many things made more sense to me for the positive.  We still need the Trumps, and we needed the Trumps when we had them.  And I’m glad Stephanie told her story, even if it was a little crazy at times talking about old boyfriends and dogs.  But the key to the Trumps and this period of time went unidentified.  Even those who were closest to the President and First Lady had no idea why they were so important and the key to the future of the freedom movement, which goes back thousands of years and is only climaxing in our present time against a shit shot from midcourt with no time on the clock for tyranny to rule again. 

Rich Hoffman

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