The Best Protection Against Corruption: Jane Timken and a good family

Yes, I’m very old-fashioned.  There was a point in time where things worked pretty well for all people of all sexes and colors, and that was before the progressive era came along infused with the corruption of Karl Marx and screwed everything up.  And I’m especially old fashioned with my politics; when I can, I like to shake hands and meet people one on one, or at least in an intimate group setting.  But with this new media culture that we are in today, we tend to look at everyone through the lens of media filtration, which is dangerous because we have seen what many of us always suspected about the media.  We shouldn’t have been surprised; they were all trained in the same kind of places and are owned by corporations looking to expand their markets through globalism, ready to abandon America and the Constitution along the way.  Yet, I still make most of my decisions about politics based on meeting as many candidates personally as possible before deciding to rally on their behalf.  That includes President Trump; I met him several times in 2015 and 2016, with very few cameras and people around.  Before he could command a $10,000 donation to shake his hand and get a picture for a desk, he already had celebrity, but few took him seriously in politics.  I like to look a person in the eyes and see what is going on in there.  It takes that for me to feel good about a candidate at any level.  For the upcoming senate seat in Ohio that Rob Portman is leaving behind, I’ll admit that Jane Timken was about third on my list to consider.  But I did get a chance to meet with her in a small group setting which I appreciated being invited to very much, and the result for me was a lot more respect for Jane than I had before the meeting.  I always liked her and respected what she did in Ohio for the Republican Party and uniting that party behind Trump in a hostile political setting.  Yet upon meeting her in a closed environment with the media far away, I learned some great things about her, particularly what motivates her. I came out feeling excited for her inclusion into the senate race, which will be a big part of recapturing the Senate not just with a GOP majority but with America First advocates and strategic influencers.  That last part for me is the most important. 

Before I say what I’m about to, I know many people who had not benefited from a great family experience when they were growing up.  One of my best friends is something of an immigrant, being raised in foster homes and had been given every opportunity to fail that you can imagine.  He could have given up hundreds of times over the years, and nobody would have blamed him.   However, today he’s very rich, very powerful, and a very good person untouched by corruption, and I love him to death.  But his success says a lot more about him than it does about how people arrive at success in life, no matter how success is measured.  His story is a rare exception. For most people, without a good upbringing, without good parents, grandparents, and a functional family structure, people are doomed in life often before they ever get out of middle school in their formative years.  Its not always their fault, but it is a failure of social structure, political philosophy, and radical insurgents over time in their priorities for social well-being.  As a general rule, young men grow up and marry women like their mothers, and young women grow up and form their lives around their fathers, and those sentiments last a lifetime, from the cradle to the grave.  That makes it reasonably confident that they will likely be pretty good adults to work with if a person had a good family life.  If they didn’t and are always looking for things in their adult life to bury the pain of their childhoods, you can bet that corruption isn’t far behind for them.  Who a person ends up being in life is often dependent entirely on how good their childhood was and whether or not they had a functionally good relationship with their moms and dads. 

I’ve liked Kristi Noem since she arrived on the political scene because she got into politics for many reasons involving her family. All people should get involved in politics to make it better.  After her dad died, her family was hit with massive death taxes that threatened to destroy everything they had built together.  So she became politically active, which has been good.  She is an influential person to her core and can handle the meat grinder of corrupt politics very well.  I recently traveled through South Dakota, and you could feel her leadership style there as she was one of the first governors to stand up to the Dr. Fauci types using Covid as a Kotter change state to bring Marxism to American culture.  It has been a war not with tanks and guns but with health directors intent on torpedoing a healthy economy in an attempt to knock Trump out of office.  I would point to Kristi Noem’s dad expressly and say that today’s strong woman fighting against all odds started with her relationship with her dad.   And with many of these strong new women in the Republican Party leading from the front, with congressional and Senate seats, we are finding that to be the repeated case.  Fathers have massive impacts on daughters leaving them to preserve like mothers the product of the family happiness, a country that the family can grow in and bring opportunity to the future.  But their first swipe at that dream comes from a father holding the hand of a young daughter and teaching her how to be a good person, set goals in life and not compromise themselves to corruption and apathy, and preserve the conditions of those bonding moments forever. 

This past week, meeting Jane Timken running for the Senate seat of the outgoing Rob Portman, I saw in her eyes what I see in Kristi Noem’s eyes.  Jane is a person who loves her dad and her family.  And when asked questions about why she wanted to get into politics, she was not murky about it.  Her dad was her motivation.  And this part she didn’t say, but she didn’t need to.  Like most young people who had positive family experiences, they become adults wanting to preserve their parents’ world for the future to preserve the happy thoughts of tradition.  And that for Jane, it wasn’t a power trip to ride the America First agenda to a big office in Washington D.C. with a line of lobbyists outside to lick the dust off her shoes.  Jane was in politics to preserve the vision of a father whom she loved, and that told me she was a fighter against corruption and the forces behind it that we are all facing today.  Learning all this, Jane Timken was suddenly a lot more viable than she was before I met her.  That is essentially why our children are attacked in schools, why we are being poisoned with drugs from illegal immigration, pornography by the tech companies, from every direction essentially.  The war against the family wasn’t just personal.

When divorce lawyers were promoted in the 60s, 70s, and 80s as freedom from an unhappy life and putting a career in front of a family was introduced as noble, they intended to destroy America.  Not to preserve it.  And so the way to fix that problem is to make families first, and the nation will follow.  But to do that, we need people running the country who function from that happy place of family and can withstand the riggers of public opinion so long as they can go home at night and have a family that loves them.  With Jane Timken and others who are emerging, I see a lot of hope for America.  The decline we are experiencing was purposeful and strategic.  The American dream is not dead now or in the future.  So long as there are fathers who inspire their daughters to run for Senate and win to preserve those memories of long walks and hand-holding that comes with a good parent inspiring a child with the goals of a lifetime—we have a fighting chance.

Rich Hoffman

The Gunfighter’s Guide to Business

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.