Hoffman Lenses on Scientology: The need for fathomglasses behind the veil

To use a James Joyce word, it takes fathomglasses often to see the world properly. Or more appropriately updated from the fine B-movie They Live by John Carpenter, it takes Hoffman Lenses. Out of all the names Carpenter could have used for the sunglasses that showed the wearer what was really going on behind the thin veil of reality it seems more than a convenient coincidence. Yet before that movie was made, it was normal for my view of the world to use fathomglasses to see well behind the aspects of society into the core of motivation, whether that motivation is the way cells behave toward one another during daily bodily maintenance, or how creatures of substance use their intellect to accomplish primordial tasks. Fathomglasses—“Hoffman Lenses,” are useful to understand the world in ways that are not so obvious. It takes work to wear them, but it is worth the effort.

When I was young and an upcoming writer I did the path toward progress that most writers go through. I took courses, mentored by established writers like Sol Stein and Linda Nagata, submitted to magazines of fiction and participated in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest which seemed like a good place for my type of pulp fiction. So it didn’t take long for members of the Church of Scientology to reach out to me which I looked into because of Tom Cruise. Upon my investigation it was quite clear to me that L. Ron Hubbard used his relationship with Jack Parsons, and the cult of Aleister Crowley to invent a new religion renaming some of the creatures and mythology of H.P. Lovecraft to support a growing New Age awareness of spiritual enlightenment into the hidden history of mankind which is slowly being revealed.

The Xenu character from Scientology is but one of the mythological characters that are potentials of the Lovecraft mythology regarding the origins not only of the universe, but specifically of mankind. There is no way for history to confirm that there was ever a Xenu who was the dictator of a Galactic Confederacy 75 million years ago just as there is no way to claim that there was ever a Jesus, Moses, or Abraham. All we know is that a writer put down a story and people decided to follow whatever prophet emerged from that particular mythology and place their faith into. More and more, I am convinced that the current history that we have all been following was designed to conceal the unusual background of mankind’s true origins, and the reason is the preservation of religious power as it currently shapes modern politics. Using fathomglasses to look deep into the veil of reality, it is quite clear that something is amiss regarding human history.

Ron Hubbard to his credit in his book Dianetics tries to help people find a healthy balance between Western technology and Oriental philosophy by dividing the mind into three parts, an analytical mind, a reflective mind, and a somatic mind. The essence of a person lives on for infinite rebirths so it’s kind of like the Hindu religion on overdrive. I think there was a sincere attempt to help people live in an awakened condition. But Hubbard ultimately was a collectivist who yearned to be a supreme leader of some order using his relationship with Parsons and witnessing the power of Crowley as a launch point. I continue to be stunned that Tom Cruise became a member of Scientology after his movie Eyes Wide Shut. You’d think he would have learned something on that movie shoot, but it’s his life and I ultimately think less of him because of his open worship of Hubbard. Once I learned all this I stepped back and away from the Writers of the Future events and made a decision that most of the people in the publishing industry were either open socialists, or Scientologists recruiting for their order. I didn’t want to be a part of their collective order in any regard.   With my fathomglasses, I see the followers of Jesus in much the same way as the followers of L. Ron Hubbard—they are organizing a cult they believe will take them to the next step beyond the veil—and they are largely missing the point—because they do not see the truth—because they are not allowing themselves to see the world through their own fathomglasses. They allow some leader to provide it to them—even knowing that the leader was a successful science fiction writer who wanted to advance his theory of Xenu worship. While I enjoy the Xenu mythology–until someone produces a DC-8 spaceship as a relic from millions of years ago, there is no way that anybody in their right mind would sign a billion year contract to Scientology. Anyone who would in my opinion is signing up for a cult.

It’s not that Hubbard and Lovecraft were incorrect about their pulp stories, which should be considered fiction that provokes possibilities rather than Biblical text. Fiction is a form of developing fathomglasses that can take the mind to good places of thought, so the practice of contemplation is healthy. When it gets unhealthy is when the leaders of an organization behave the way they were reported to in the supplied documentaries on Scientology—shown here. Whenever a group of people starts drawing lines between those on the inside and those on the out, they are trying to create a cult. When people try to report on that cult, or prevent them from leaving for whatever reason—or attempt to use the cult as a wedge against families, the line is crossed and the effectiveness of the mythology is greatly minimized. At that point the religious attempts of the cult have lost their intent at being a positive force, and have regulated themselves into the evils of collectivism.

But in a world where religion is used as a safety blanket to mask the harshness of only perceived realities, there is no shortage of prophets who want to be the next Jesus, or Buddha. Most people want to be remembered for something when they die away, and even those with very active imaginations yearn for the respect of the social masses placed upon them through collectivism. Yet the Hoffman Lenses say that the answer is not within those groups, associations, or prophets—but is yet deeper still where only fathomglasses into infinity can penetrate. I have found that I can see much deeper without any group associations, so I stopped caring about the Writers of the Future contests, or the published magazines. I decided to write from within and let the chips fall where they will mostly ignoring the world and its noise. Hubbard cared far too much for his place in the fabric of history to have seen the world with the proper fathomglasses, so to me he was only a science fiction writer who wanted the respect of a religion that he created. He may have had good intentions but the byproduct of those intentions were collectivism and that is the legacy of Scientology. There may be some truth to the auditing process, to the gradual revelation about Zenu, but like most religions that expect congregations to fall in to some sort of submission behind an established protocol of behavior—the individual is ignored and consumed in favor of the collective. Hubbard based his Scientology on portions of Oriental religion—which of course is based on mysticism. That aspect alone invalidates the authenticity of the endeavor.

Tom Cruise may get angry at my Hoffman Lenses, but he’d see the same if he truly viewed the world with the proper fathomglasses into reality—instead of trusting some human being quite capable of bad judgment and manipulated imagination. By that I mean that I mistrust any prophet who declares that something came to them in a dream, or was provided by some angel—or demon. If I look with the lenses of fathomglasses it is quite clear that the essence of evil and maleficent hunger brew many stage plays against the human race for designs not entirely visible to our spectrum of understanding. I don’t think there is a religion on earth capable of taking individual minds to the places that the Hoffman Lenses can see. They can try, but they all fall dreadfully short. The only way to cross that great gulf is through individual achievement. No collective endeavor can ferry the mind to such a place seen by the fathomglasses of reason. And that is the danger of following a cult, as opposed to truly walking the fine line between reality and the hidden mysteries deliberately concealed from us by those who least want us to know what is going on behind the veil.

Groups of people are easy to control, whereas individuals are loose cannons. The vile maleficent who hide in the shadows whether it be Zenu or Azathoth may try to inspire followers into the safe embrace of some prophet, but why? The answer of course is that once there, those followers can be steered into the direction of choosing. The answer to these mysteries will never be found in such directed places—and so long as they continue, mankind will continue to flip around on a dry dock as if just caught by some lowly fisherman sporting a past time and offering life in a mere bucket of water. The real answers are in the depths of the oceans, beyond the religion, the threats of sickness, insanity of all human limitations. And to reach those places you need fathomglasses worn by an individual to see them.

I love that move, They Live!  And for those who doubt this little report on Scientology watch the videos presented, and you too will begin to really see.

Rich Hoffman

 CLIFFHANGER RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

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